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Boy Scout Troop 668
(Worth, Illinois)
 
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How do Scouts earn Merit Badges?


The day a boy signs his BSA application, he is eligible to start working on Merit Badges. 

Completing a Merit Badge involves 4 people... The Scout, the Scoutmaster, the Merit Badge Councilor (MBC), and the troop's Advancement Chair.

The process:

1.  Scout chooses a badge (or badges) that he'd like to work on (alone or with another Scout).

2   He informs the Scoutmaster of his intention to work on a badge, and is issued a "blue card" and given the contact information for a registered Merit Badge Counselor (MBC).  A MBC can be ANY registered MBC in any Council.  He is not obligated to  work with councilors in his home unit or Council. CONTRARY TO URBAN MYTH, the Scoutmaster can NOT deny any Scout the opportunity to work on any badge, nor can he delay the badge being awarded once the MBC signs the "blue card" showing that it is complete.  Judgment as to whether a Scout successfully completed the badge requirements rests solely with the MBC.

3.  The Scout(s) contacts the MBC and make arrangements to meet as often as necessary to complete the badge requirements (following Youth Protection guidelines at all times).   Upon the first meeting, the Scout presents the MBC with the blue card, which the counselor keeps so that he can update completion dates and keep track of the Scout's progress.

4.  Upon completion, the MBC will sign all 3 segments of the blue card, and return it back to the Scout who in turn, presents it to the Scoutmaster for final signature indicating final recognition that all work is complete.  Again, the Scoutmaster does NOT have the authority to deny, "retest", or delay the formal completion of any MB work. 

5. The Scoutmaster will pass the signed segments along to the troop's Advancement Chairperson who will record the work on the Troop and Council levels, and ensure the Scout is presented with his badge on the next possible opportunity. *

*  While NOT mandatory that a badge be presented right away, the BSA strongly encourages "instant recognition" for effort.  The typical model is to present the badge by the next meeting, and present the "pocket card" during a formal presentation at the next Court of Honor. 

6.  The Scout will be given 1 segment of his blue card which he must keep so that it can be produced when applying for his Eagle Rank.  The Troop should also retain a segment for their records.

What badges are "Eagle Required" ?



There are a total of 21 Merit Badges required for the rank of Eagle.

12 of these badges are Eagle Required "White Bands"  (merit badges with white/silver border stitching around the edges).

The remaining 9 (or more if you choose) may be any badges from among the remaining 109 non-Eagle required "Green Band" merit badges (badges with green stitching around the border).

While there are 15 possible Eagle Merit Badges, there are some that are "optional".  Refer to the picture to clearly understand which badges qualify for Eagle, and which ones do not.   Earning MORE THAN ONE of the optional badges will NOT afford you the choice to NOT earn other required badges, but "extra" Eagle badges can be counted towards the mandatory total of 21.

What is the one piece of advice for Scouts?

READ THE BOOK !

The Boy Scout Handbook does an EXCELLENT job explaining the BSA Program. 

It also provides valuable skill instruction and has the potential to IGNITE dreams of adventure, exploration, and fun for boys of all backgrounds and abilities.... all of which are POSSIBLE in this troop! 

"I'm bored" are the 2 words NO Scout has a right to say, as we are determined to help bring all their ideas into reality.

Spend time with your son each night (especially if he is new to Scouting).   Read the book with him.  Quiz him on a skill, or "challenge" him to a knot tying contest.  Ask him how he sees himself living up to the Scout Law.

Don't let Scouting be "2 hours a month" at Thursday Troop Meetings, but a regular and routine part of every day.